Origami tutus and ballet in public spaces by montreal artists

The PLI.Ē Project fuses the delicate balancing act of ballet, and the intricate, yet subtle touch of paper folding into a colorful display of movements. The project was created by two Montreal based artists, who were seeking for ways to bring their different field into one working performance. Featuring dancers in human size, paper apparels, the PLI.E project sorts to showcase dance and paper crafts.

Creators Melika Dez ( who manged the photography and models) and Pauline Loctin ( who created the costumes ) came together in 2018 for the first part of the project. Each focusing on their area of prominence and diving location and placement of dancers between themselves.

“Paper can be a fragile material to work with and that is exactly why we decided to make the impossible, possible. No matter which element we would be confronted to, water (rain), wind, we wanted to show that we are limitless.” Pauline Loctin

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young Serbian artist draws complicated animal ecosystems

Young Serbian , Dusan Krtolica, is a talented 16 years old quite gifted with the art of pencil sketches. producing simple sketches of animal anatomy to complex ecosystems, featuring several queries, all made exclusively with lead pencil.

“drawing is my greatest passion, and I find my inspiration in nature. I am mostly fascinated by animals and their great diversity, as well as their amazing ability to adapt to living in many different environments.”

Surreal glass sculptures by Simone Crestani

I am an artisan first, before being an artist.
Glass working is a very complex technique that requires years of study and extreme dedication. I was fortunate to learn this technique while I was still young. Glass chose me, before I had any idea what I wanted to become.
I feel blessed to be the medium through which glass can express itself, in the continuous search for its full potential.

In these years of study, my thoughts were forged by the delicate rules of glass working: ignited by the high melting temperatures, stemmed by the risk of breaking, withstanding the test of time, continuously searching for limits to overcome.

Photos from winners of the Sony World Photography Award 2019

Photography , some say, say a thousand words. This ancient quote is effectively captured in the recent installment of the Sony World Photography Awards,” one of the many photography contest from the Japanese camera company.

The contest is currently the 12th installment, and with the goal to showcase the best contemporary photography around the world.

+15 satifying images of Los angeles by George townley

California artist George townley celebrates the spirit of Los Angeles with incredibly colorful, and minimalist depictions of its important landmarks in 2d rendering.

+10 surreal crochets of animal anatomy by Caitlin MacCormack

Philadelphia based Illustrator Caitlin Mccormack   crafts intricately detailed macabre arts works of wool and cotton; all sculptures of the skeletal structures of animals encased in built frames.

Her really abstraction knitting feature weird , surreal headless animal-like creatures and also paintings rendered on books and original sketches.
Caitlin McCormack received a BFA in Illustration in 2010 from the University of the Arts in Philadelphia PA. She lives with two cats in South Philly and crochets to forget the world, in the chaos of her slovenly, nest-like studio. She currently receives representation from Paradigm Gallery + Studio.

Whimsical food arts by DIY creative Helga stentzel

Uk based creative Helga stentzel is one to ‘play ‘ with food. Several of his work follow the theme of edible form of animals, or fun , quacky situations created with food items. A few of his works are below.

+15 surreal sculptures inspired by the sea by Rohan Mersh

Rowan Mersh is a multi-media sculptor who explores form through intuitive application of a material’s inherent qualities. His diverse and experimental approach to creation is epitomized by his ability to take very ordinary materials and transform them into the extraordinary. From textile sculpture to kinetic and interactive installation, Mersh’s pieces are inventive and multipurpose, bridging the realms of art, design and fashion.

Regularly exhibiting internationally with Gallery FUMI, Mersh’s sculptures have been acquired by major private and public collections the world over, most notably the V&A, Jerwood and The Crafts Council collections. His commissions and special projects include works for the Mercury Music Prize, Fendi and Veuve Clicquot.

Mersh, a graduate of the Royal College of Art in 2005, continues to live and work in London.

Stained mirrors by French- Italian designer Inga Sempe

With a mirror you can see yourself, but above all you can liven up a wall and light your room, as if it were a window or a lamp always left on. In antique shops you can often find what we know as Venetian mirrors, in which the central glass is surrounded by other smaller pieces of mirror, a simple and attractive way to both frame and reflect.

I wanted to develop this idea in the Vitrail collection, combining clear and coloured mirrors. I created mirrors made up of several pieces in contrasting colours. They are held together by an injection moulded rubber frame : its softness allows the fragments to be inserted into the triangular gaps in the thin rubber structure.

Vitrail comes in four different formats which can be hung horizontally or vertically. The collection includes a small square, a large rectangle, and an oval, all made up of a large, clear, central mirror decorated with two coloured fragments. These versions are injected in both colours ; each one features a distinctive combination of lateral mirrors. The fourth model is round, and is divided into five strips.

It comes in two contrasting versions : a light grey frame with fragments of pastel green glass, and a green frame with fragments of mirror fading from black through to light grey. It can be hung in three ways : horizontally, vertically or diagonally. The Vitrail collection have a total of eight versions of mirrors.