Stunning images of the spectacular Wave building just completed in Demark

The Wave Development – design by Henning Larsen Architects in Jutland, Denmark reached it’s final completion following an eleven-year construction period interrupted by the global financial crisis, Henning Larsen’s The Wave apartment building in Vejle,

The Wave incorporates an open, public pier – establishing it as a social and residential hub, and an enduring presence in the vitalization of the Vejle waterfront.


After construction efforts were re-initiated in 2015, the final three towers are complete – fulfilling Henning Larsen‘s original vision. Its five iconic crests rising above Vejle Fjord, The Wave stands as an architectural tribute to local heritage and geography.

“The land surrounding Vejle is unique for its rolling hills, which are an uncommon sight in Denmark,”
explains Søren Øllgaard, Partner and Design Director at Henning Larsen.

“We designed The Wave as striking new presence in the Vejle skyline, one that reflects and embodies the surrounding area. We feel our design merges our own contemporary designs with a strong sense of local identity.”

Spanish architect dreams ups modular disaster relief homes

For the execution of this project a rationalized constructive system is proposed, with metal tubes arranged in a lattice shape, defined a basic module with 37 m² of area. The trellis is turned 45 degrees in relation to the floor gaining main prominence in the facade besides working correctly in the stabilization of the set. 

For the closures, the 10 cm apparent concrete block was chosen, seated in a juxtaposed way and tied to the structure, creating a more solid and welcoming environment. This proposed prefabrication system seeks to adapt both in the industrial process and the traditional construction site, since concrete blocks and steel pipes are well received in both conditions.

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The basic unit presented is flexible occupying a projection of 25 m² in the ground (3.20×8.44m) and is divided into two floors connected by a ladder type maleiro, executed with profiles of 3x3cm. The intention in this study is to leave the system purposely open enabling it for large and small builders and for large or small housing complexes. The unit can also be thought for several uses at different scales

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Kengo Kuma completes V&A Dundee Scottish museum

Beyond its curved walls, V&A Dundee is reconnecting the city with its beautiful and historic riverside. the museum is at the heart of a £1 billion waterfront transformation, an ambitious 30-year project that is propelling the city towards an improved future. Kuma’s vision for V&A Dundee is that it will be a welcoming space for everyone to visit, enjoy and socialise in – a ‘living room for the city’ – and a way of reconnecting the city to its historic River Tay waterfront.

international centre of design, V&A Dundee will present the brilliance of Scottish creativity and the best of design from around the world. the first ever dedicated design museum in Scotland and the only other V&A museum anywhere in the world outside London, V&A Dundee will provide a place of inspiration, discovery, and learning through its mission to enrich lives through design.Construction of the building is being led by Dundee City Council, with project management from Turner & Townsend. The total cost of design, construction and fit-out is £80.11m.

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V&A Dundee was designed by renowned award-winning Japanese architects Kengo Kuma & Associates, following an international competition, and is Kuma’s first building in the UK. Considered by many as the quintessential Japanese architect of today, Kuma is also designing the stadium for the Tokyo 2020 Olympics.

the three-storey building is itself a testament to great design. Curving concrete walls (there are no straight external walls) hold 2,500 pre-cast rough stone panels, weighing up to 3000 kg each and spanning up to 4m wide, to create the appearance of a Scottish cliff face. There are 21 separate wall sections. V&A Dundee is an impressive 8,000m² building, with 1,650m² of gallery space.

kengo-kuma-v-a-dundee-design-museum-scotland-designboom-05V&A Dundee would help attract new businesses, investors and professionals to the area.

 

kengo-kuma-v-a-dundee-design-museum-scotland-designboom-03V&A Dundee on the historic, Scottish River front Tay.

the new museum would be a catalyst, and point of connection which would brings people and diverse organisations together in a new creative way. it would house hundreds of historically significant objects from the renowned V&A collections alongside prominent loans from across Scotland and around the world,  hosting international touring exhibitions– the only location in the UK outside London.

the V&A Dundee was built with  the best of environmental considerations, with a thirty 200-metre deep bore holes form part of its heating and cooling system, supp -lemented by air source heat pumps on the roof. These provide direct renewable energy for the museum, with 800,000 kWh/annum of heating and 500,000 kWh/annum of cooling.

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Along with V&A Dundee, Kuma is involved in a number of large, ongoing projects, including arts centres in Besançon and Granada.

 

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Anita Jambor exhibits a cache of Intricately patterned Atria.

 

the unique feature of the atrium is the wide open space it engender, broad. Atriums or Atria are a popular design feature as they  engender  the “feeling of space and light.”

Atria are popular with building users, building designers and building developers. Users like atria because they create a dynamic and stimulating interior that provides shelter from the external environment while maintaining a visual link  with the external environment. As part of her recent travel project, Anita jambor of Vellumlife photography shows off a collection of the captured atriums all around Europe. Her collection boast a wild array of colourful designs and unique patterns.

The National Gallery, London

The National Gallery, London

Alcázar of Seville, Spain

Seville Cathedral, Spain

Alcázar of Seville, Spain

Alcázar of Seville, Spain

The National Gallery, London

Seville Cathedral, Spain

Seville Cathedral, Spain

Seville Cathedral, Spain

British Museum, London

The skylines of Chicago in Monochrome

Chicago Skyline from The Pritzker Pavillion, Millennium Park | Chicago, IL
Two Prudential Plaza (L) Aon Center (R) | Chicago, IL | Loebl, Schlossman & Hackl; Edward Durell Stone w/ Perkins & Will
Two Prudential Plaza | Chicago, IL | Loebl, Schlossman & Hackl
Wrigley Building (L) Chicago Tribune (R) | Chicago, IL | Graham, Anderson, Probst & White; Howells & Hood
Wrigley Building (L) Chicago Tribune (R) | Chicago, IL | Graham, Anderson, Probst & White; Howells & Hood
London Guarantee Building (L), Mather Tower (R) | Chicago, IL
35 East Wacker Drive | Chicago, IL | Giaver Dinkelberg Thielbar & Fugard
Marina City, IBM Building, Trump Tower (L-R) | Chicago, IL | Bertrand Goldberg; Mies van der Rohe; SOM
Brunswick Building (L) & Richard J. Daley Center (R) | Chicago, IL | SOM; CF Murphy; Loebl, Schlossman, Bennett
Xerox Center (L) & Chase Tower (R) | Chicago, IL | Helmut Jahn; CF Murphy

 

IDMM architects builds cubical structure in Down-town Seoul, South Korea

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F.S.One is a unique hotel in the centre of Cheongi-si, a dense metropolitan  centre in  heart of Seoul, South Korea. Commissioned by IDMM architects ,FS One was recognized with the Korean Architectural Prize of Excellence for best design in architecture (2016)  for its use of  concrete moulds, prefabricated walls, and lots of exposure to natural elements.

” it proposes a transformation of the program of the ‘neighborhood rental facility’, stripping down the gigantic concrete mass to yield solid piloti, podium and stairs.” 

The open air hotel integrates high profit programs, shelter, shade, and stages diverse interactions. Occupying a corner site, the five-story commercial space is composed entirely of reinforced concrete forms a series of viewfinders connected by angled bridges that offer non-traditional spaces inside and natural rooftop stairs that become seating in an urban stage.

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image © yoon joon hwan

the structure, with its massive floating volumes, invites visitors to explore within and throughout its various levels. circulation moves freely from interior to exterior and back to interior again through the various staircases elevated above the ground level. full-height glass panes inset from the large openings concluding each form allow for views both inside and outside of the structure attracting visitors while framing the different urban views for guests inside. the top floor is a private space for the client in a form elevated above the commercial space below and supported by large pilotis. on the underside of the floating form, a series of lights pixelate the exposed soffit providing partial shelter over the stairs.

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© yoon joon hwan

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image © yoon joon hwan

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image © yoon joon hwan

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image © yoon joon hwan

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image © yoon joon hwan

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image © yoon joon hwan

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image © yoon joon hwan

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image © yoon joon hwan

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image © yoon joon hwan

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image © yoon joon hwan

 

Clive Architects remodels the microsoft excellence center : Canada

 The ever-growing workforce of the global tech-giant, Microsoft, prompted the company to relocate and expand their Vancouver offices into a 142,000 square feet space into a newly renovated department store building in Downtown Vancouver. Specifically the Microsoft Excellence center , Canada was to be remodeled by the American architectural firm  Clive  Willinson architects  ; tasked with the duty of the expanding new spaces for two gaming units and a software developer company.  

The remodel removed the solid facade , and re-skinned the building with a new glass curtain wall, exposing the spectacular views of the city and the surrounding landscapes. Occupying the top two floors of the building, the new open workplace takes full advantage of expansive views. Designed for future flexibility as the business model morphs with anticipated future developments. The workplace is supported with a wide variety of open and enclosed collaboration spaces to facilitate the various work-flow needs.
Included throughout are amenity spaces, such as a distinctly unique reception area adjacent to a café with espresso bar for staff and visitors, a game room, and technology spaces including a maker lab where employees can explore creative ideas for new projects.
The design team drew upon the distinct natural setting of the company’s Seattle headquarters as well as the natural landmarks of Canada’s Lower Mainland to inform the architecture. the airy, branch-like ceiling structures and the more grounded, boulder-like enclosures are a visual reference to canopies and roots, respectively, of the giant tree specimens unique to the area. To capitalize on existing conditions, an existing void in the upper level’s floor slab was utilized to introduce a communicating stair that spans and connects the two floors, as the trunk of a tree connects its disparate parts.
The expansive floor plates are defined by neighborhoods of open work benches woven together with circulation paths that purposefully expand to incorporate open and semi-enclosed collaboration “rooms.” Moments of vibrant color punctuate these collaborative spaces as well as strategically located social gathering areas, such as the hubs for meeting and eating and multipurpose rooms. The new occupants have responded very postively to the design concept of simultaneously revealing the workings of the architecture and expressing an aspirational theme of working community within a naturalistic, wood-framed setting.
PHOTOGRAPHY BY EMA PETER