Artist unveils intractive face for British tudor monarch

The Queen’s House, Greenwich has unveiled a major new installation ; using digital scans of Elizabeth’s portraits and the electrotype cast of her effigy, as well as descriptions by her contemporaries, the installation is a chillingly lifelike recreation of Elizabeth I.

Positioned directly opposite the Armada Portrait and suspended in isolation on surveillance mirror, the installation places both the aging and ageless Elizabeth in dialogue. Through this careful juxtaposition, explores the different sides of the queen, both real and imagined, and grapples with notions of mortality, the manipulation of truth, political propaganda and the extent to which female power is tied to appearance and youth.

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Commissioned by  acclaimed British mixed media artist, Mat Collishaw, “The  The Mask of Youth” , responds directly to one of the most important paintings in the Museum’s collection, the iconic and powerful Armada Portrait of Elizabeth I.

The Armada Portrait commemorates the most famous conflict of Elizabeth’s reign (1558–1603), the Spanish Armada’s failed attempt to invade England in July and August 1588. Despite being painted shortly after the invasion when the Queen was almost fifty-five, the painting depicts a woman who looks considerably younger. Inspired by this idealised image of the Tudor Queen, Collishaw has collaborated with leading special effects designers using cutting-edge technology to create a stand-alone animatronic mask which approximates Elizabeth’s appearance at the age of the portrait’s creation.

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Known for his fusion of technology and art, Collishaw brings Elizabeth back to life before her audience. By leaving the animatronics that facilitate her movements deliberately exposed at the back of her head, the artist suggests that behind Elizabeth’s public persona, her every movement was carefully controlled. Beneath the surface and behind her mask, she is busy making decisions and calculations to which no one else is privy.

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Inspired by historic art throughout his career, Collishaw has long been fascinated by the Armada Portrait and its function as a political statement that emphasises the sovereignty and ‘agelessness’ of a queen who in reality was middle aged, unmarried and heirless. Whilst Elizabeth’s portraits were designed to flatter, they also highlight her understanding of the fact that her public image could be used to suggest her power and authority. As a woman of intelligence, she used this tool to help overcome the cultural prejudices she faced due to her gender and to advertise her virtues, skills and competence as a female head of state.

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Mat Collishaw’s Mask of Youth is on display at the Queen’s House from 3 October 2018 – 3 February 2019.

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Thomas Wing-Evan 80HZ installation in Sydney

Digitising data does not necessarily make it more accessible. As information becomes abundant, exploring it becomes increasingly complex. 80Hz builds on concepts of data sonification commonly used in the fields of astronomy and oceanography to understand data. However, 80Hz refocusses data science processes onto images in order to explore artistic content. Using this tool, artworks become musical compositions that reflect their visual and metadata. Fundamentally, the project connects the data of past and present, translating it into sound, as a common language to be appreciated by all.

 80Hz  is an experimental tool and instrument for understanding the NSW State Library catalogue through sound. The name 80Hz embodies history, data and sound in one value. It is the frequency generated by one of the earliest instruments used to communicate information. The practical operation and historical significance of this tool has been interpreted as the driving concept for this proposal.

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80Hz exists digitally and physically, online and onsite. As a digital tool it is experiential and interactive, allowing users to sonically explore the catalogue elements before researching further. It has a life beyond the fellowship as an adaptable tool for musical exploration of library data. As a physical instrument it is mysterious and performative, inhabiting the library, allowing it to form a connection with the city and making the collection immersive.

In the future it will act as a template for the library to explore further ways to combine creativity, data and performance within the city. Completed by Thomas Wing-Evans , British designer and architect  in collaboration with the dx lab

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German engineer design concept airbag for cell phone protection

German engineering student, Philip Frenzel has presented a concept prototype to  the growing market of smart phone screen protection cases . The design seeks to answer the question around ” dropping your phone by error” . while regular rubber cases offers some  sort mitigation but most drops still leave your phones with significant damages.

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Frenzel’s device comprises a slightly burgled case with four prongs along the four cardinals of the phone; each triggered by sensors which detect a free falling device, and deploys , as legs to cushion the effect of the ground collision. And this could quickly be reset by pushing the prongs back in place.

 

Philips who is still in Aalen University  already won a national design prize from the German Mechatronics Society for his well thought out innovation. And he plans to launch a crowdfunding campaign on Kickstarter for his creation, which, if it receives sufficient backing would see the first sets of case hit the market.

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Re:scam is an AI which engages spam email on your behalf

Re:scam is an artificial intelligent bot  with the special concern to manage and correspond with spam email. It does this with fain curiosity and  naive keenness in the product or business on offer from the potential con-artist.   The conversational quagmire serves to delay with an endless string of questions and anecdotes, which drains the time and enthusiasm in scam ploy.

Re: scam assumes unique identities to mimic the suppose victims. It follows through on a native scam/con email exchange,  tainting the conversations with errs in facts, humour, grammatical and spellings errors.  imitating real human tendencies  as a means to collecting data on behaviour and pattern of scam

 

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Netsafe  employs machine learning optimization in sorting and assessing the ”spam credential” of any  email. But they still seek  the public to send junk or scam email to allow them accumulate more data and allow the email AI Re:scam learn.

designed and built by New Zealand based Business security outfit.  Re:scam – is an initiative aimed at helping people from becoming fraud victims by occupying the time and resources of scammers through deploying a well-educated artificially intelligent chat bot.

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Bipedal robot displays advancement in gyroscopal balance

It’s extremely difficult to make a bipedal robot that can move effectively, much less kick off a tumbling routine. The beauty of four-legged robots is that they balance easily, both at rest and as they’re moving, but bipeds like Atlas have to balance a bulky upper body on just two legs. Accordingly, you could argue that roboticists can better spend their time on non-human forms that are easier to master.

But there’s a case to be made for Atlas and the other bipeds like Cassie (which walks more like a bird than a human). We live in a world built for humans, so there may be situations where you want to deploy a robot that works like a human. If you have to explore a contaminated nuclear facility, for instance, you’ll want something that can climb stairs and ladders, and turn valves. So a humanoid may be the way to go.

If anything gets there, it’ll be Atlas. Over the years, it’s grown not only more backflippy but lighter and more dextrous and less prone to fall on its face. Even if it does tumble, it can now get back up on its own. So it’s not hard to see a future when Atlas does indeed tread where fleshy humans dare not. Especially now that Boston Dynamics is part of the Japanese megacorporation SoftBank, which mayhave some cash to spend.

While Atlas doing backflips is full-tilt insane, humanoids still struggle. Manipulation, for one, poses a big obstacle, because good luck replicating the human hand. And battery life is a nightmare, what with all the balancing. But who knows, maybe one day humanoids will flip into our lives, or at the very least at the Olympics.

 

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But there’s a case to be made for Atlas and the other bipeds like Cassie (which walks more like a bird than a human). We live in a world built for humans, so there may be situations where you want to deploy a robot that works like a human. If you have to explore a contaminated nuclear facility, for instance, you’ll want something that can climb stairs and ladders, and turn valves. So a humanoid may be the way to go.

If anything gets there, it’ll be Atlas. Over the years, it’s grown not only more backflippy but lighter and more dextrous and less prone to fall on its face. Even if it does tumble, it can now get back up on its own. So it’s not hard to see a future when Atlas does indeed tread where fleshy humans dare not. Especially now that Boston Dynamics is part of the Japanese megacorporation SoftBank, which mayhave some cash to spend.

While Atlas doing backflips is full-tilt insane, humanoids still struggle. Manipulation, for one, poses a big obstacle, because good luck replicating the human hand. And battery life is a nightmare, what with all the balancing. But who knows, maybe one day humanoids will flip into our lives, or at the very least at the Olympics.

 

curious chip introduces ‘ PiP ‘ a hand-held coding device

Pip is the hand-held device, designed to allow for more portability with digital creation tools. functioning in duel sense; as a gaming and tinkering platform,  the Nintendo-esque — similar to the switch — console comes with two detachable side ports which could hold controls to allow for manipulating digital contents on the low resolution screen.

Pip would aid kids, and  interested novices with premier enthusiasm into learning, experimenting and practising  with the basics of coding. Offering a mix of tinkering and task completion to solve logical problems.  Then move on to much more  advance levels and  code in multiple languages ( Javascript, Python, Lua, PHP and HTML/CSS).

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The Glasgow based company, Curious Chip  kept Pip’s smart design deliberate ; and very well lose to the switch-  gaming console. to take advantage ‘split enthusiasm’ from gaming. With its central screen and detachable side controllers, Pip has a size and shape ideal for gaming. Fitting perfectly in your pocket.

 It comes preloaded  with a selection of games and apps bundled with Pip –  Snake to Pac-Man or even Minecraft – and also with a support pack for creating those games from scratch. Pip has launch a  kick starter champaign   to bring the product live before April of 2018 .

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Pip would come with its own unique  programming environment, the Curiosity  which would offer a more simplified process to logic is offered through a shared cloud;  with “drag and drop system‘ and detachable raspberry board to tinker with – and tutorials  to support.

We wanted to make something that taught coding skills with real hardware,” said Curious Chip’s Sukhvir Dhillon. “It was important for us that people could use skills learned with Pip and go on to invent beyond our platform.”

The design built to run on the Raspberry Pi compute module 3 and  anchored on the the Raspbian OSlaundered as a great “need to have ” tool for introductory path  through logical programming, and has even attracted support from Eben Upton at Raspberry, and other major tech institution

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Playing games on Pip is suppose to merge fun, tinkering and learning into one seamless mix. with interactive playthings, and includes coding shortcuts for drawing, collision, AI, and even fancy shader effects with documentation and emulators to test and run codes. It also is flexible around it base Raspberry broad which could be detached and tinkered with.  to create LEDs flash or tool a banana into a fire button!

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Pip’s programming tool is called Curiosity, and it’s hosted on Pip itself, accessed via WiFi from any modern web-browser, so there’s no software to download and install.

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Curiosity allows Pip to be programmed using a number of popular programming languages, including JavaScript, Python, Lua, PHP and HTML5. Scratch-inspired drag-and-drop block programming is also supported with our own Google Blockly based editor, making it really easy to access all of Pip’s built-in functionality from a simple, visual programming language.

Curious Chip hopes to encourage a collaborative community and make it easy  to share the exciting things for young coders.

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Samsung Dex seamlessly blend mobile and desktop experiences

 a new take on digital inner connection and merging of multiple device. The  dex book is a product designed around the  seemly separated function of both devices. it allows for an  enlarge experience and emboldened experience of both platforms ; sharing more cordless interaction with the laptop.

The dex book is a concept PC for the Samsung  brand, imagined by two South Korean  industrial designers ;  kwanjun Ryu  and Jaejin Bong  both part of the design milieu for Samsung.  The new line-up of,  co-opted elements of he  the four AI and machine learning. And, was marked as a sensation to the It industry but yet to see approval for production.

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the Dex feature a “phonehole on the  desk , where the keyboard would sit. the “phone-hole” serves as a connection port. through which streams of interaction/ and data would flow. reducing physical separation  drastically.

this design blends the boundary between mobile and the desktop environment seamlessly with limitations of the encases significantly burred;   transitional  display and interaction would flow in an  endless, edgeless environment.  the  start interface is welcoming AL with a more personal touch of the individual user.

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Dex notebook is imagined to work solely with the Samsung galaxy series and would be light to  carry around , a little curvy  around the edges and efficient.

 

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Gilles visualizes animals in recycle materials

Various lifelike replicas of apes dot the museum in central Spain , made from non conventional materials, standing in more as motifs than art forms, and brought to life by the creative mind of  design artist Gilles cenazandotti . These sculptures do more than offer aesthetic sensibility to the space, as they seek– through the artist creation — to more than visualise effects of some what human excess to our planet, in form of waste and in length attract attention to animal welfare.

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Cenazandotti uses garbage, and random wastes collected  from the piles of washed up materials on the shores of his homeland beaches. But to create his ” semi-robotic”  , sculptures of endangered animals — such as the baboon and the polar bear– He had to spand hours shifting through materials.

among cenazandotti’s found objects are plastic bottles, combs and children’s toys. his materials are entirely plastic, rejected from the ocean and unadulterated from the state in which they have been found. the artist plays on irony, creating the beautiful animals from by-products of petroleum—a substance that is largely to blame for destroying their natural habitats and surrounding environments. his work highlights man’s forcing of animals to adapt to new, different habitats, and at the same time points towards a limit, when the sea can no longer absorb human waste.

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An abundant of mediums and materials to choose from is an unfortunate situation and, is testament to the fact that excessive the human waste is to blame for the near-extinction of these species.

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through his sculptures, the corsican artist attempts to show ‘a technological paroxysm where man tries to imitate nature through artificial recreation.’ his science fiction-like sculptures at once appealing and uncomfortable reinforce the idea that natural creation is far from human representation.previosly the head of a design company, cenazandotti has made a name for his unique style. the artist has collaborated to create site-specific design commissions with fashion designer jean paul gaultier and realized a series of interior fabrications with interior designer philippe starck

University of Stuttgart explores digital Fabrication with Pavillion

The Institute for Computational Design and Construction (ICD) and the Institute of Building Structures and Structural Design (ITKE) at the University of Stuttgart have completed a new research pavilion exploring building-scale fabrication of glass and carbon fibre-reinforced composites. The novel process is based on the unique accordances and characteristics of fibre construction.

 

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these materials are lightweight and have high tensile strength, a radically different approach to fabrication becomes possible, which combines low-payload yet long-range machines, such as unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV), with strong, precise, yet limited reach, industrial robots.

This collaborative concept enables a scalable fabrication setup for long span fibre composite construction.  The research builds on a series of successful pavilions, which investigate integrative computational design, engineering and fabrication, and explores their spatial ramifications and construction possibilities. The project was designed and fabricated by students and researchers within an interdisciplinary team of architects, engineers and biologists.

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More info:

location: keplerstr. 11-17, 70174 stuttgart, germany
completion: march 2017
area: 26.5 sqm
volume: 58 m³
fiber length: 184 km
weight: 1,000 kg
overall dimensions: 12.0m x 2.6m x 3.1m

Designed and built by the ICD institute for computational design and construction – prof. achim menges
ITKE institute of building structures and structural design – prof. jan knippers

Assisting:  benjamin felbrich, nikolas früh, marshall prado, sam saffarian, james solly, daniel reist, lauren vasey

system development, fabrication and construction: miguel aflalo, bahar al bahar, lotte aldinger, chris arias, léonard balas, jingcheng chen, federico forestiero, dominga garufi, pedro giachini, kyriaki goti, sachin gupta, olga kalina, shir katz, bruno knychalla, shamil lallani, patricio lara, ayoub lharchi, dongyuan liu, yencheng lu, georgia margariti, alexandre mballa, behrooz tahanzadeh, hans jakob wagner, benedikt wannemacher, nikolaos xenos, andre zolnerkevic, paula baptista, kevin croneigh, tatsunori shibuya, nicoló temperi, manon uhlen, li wenhan, with the support of michael preisack

in collaboration with:
institute of aircraft design (IFB) – prof. dr.-ing. p. middendorf, markus blandl, florian gnädinger
institute of engineering geodesy (IIGS) – prof. dr.-ing. habil. volker schwieger, otto lerke
department of evolutionary biology of invertebrates, university of tuebingen – prof. oliver betz
department of palaeontology of invertebrates, university of tuebingen – prof. james nebelsick

supported by:
volkswagen stiftung, GETTYLAB, kuka roboter GmbH, peri GmbH, SGL technologies GmbH, hexion stuttgart GmbH. ed. züblin AG, lange ritter GmbH, stahlbau wendeler GmbH, leica geosystems GmbH, KOFI GmbH